Employee Benefits

Want Your Employer to Help Repay Your Student Loans? Share These Facts with Your Boss

African American intern receiving instructions from from caucasian male about repaying student loans.

If you have student loan debt, you’re not alone. Over 44 million workers, from recent college graduates to those near retirement, are paying off loans. Currently, Americans have over $1.5 trillion in student loans. Most employees want employers to help them pay off some of that debt. Here are some facts to share with your employer to encourage them to help repay your student loans.

Use Existing Budget Resources

Thousands of employers have expressed interest in helping employees repay their student loans. But many say they don’t have financial resources to increase their budgets. Some also are concerned about offering equitable benefits for all employees.

Instead of increasing benefits budgets, employers can use existing resources. The majority of employers offer 401(k) retirement matching funds for employees. But every year, employees leave about $24 billion employer matching funds on the table. Many workers say that after making their student loan payment and covering living essentials, they don’t even have that extra money each month to save for retirement.

Employers can offer Employee Choice, a student loan repayment benefit, that uses the funds they’ve already set aside for 401(k) matching contributions. Employees can apply unused matching dollars to help repay their student loans. Or, they can split the matching funds to make a payment to their student loan debt and save the other part for retirement. And for employees who don’t have student loans, they can continue to use employer 401(k) matching funds for retirement savings.

Attract Talented Team Members

Employers are competing for the best employees to fill many open positions. One way to attract talented team members is to help repay their student loans.

Prospective employees want to work for employers who offer a student loan repayment benefit. It’s projected that many people won’t pay off their student loans for at least two decades. This debt burden affects employees’ dreams of buying a home, driving a better vehicle, starting a family or saving for retirement. So why not let your employer help repay your student loans?

One study showed that 52% of employees were attracted to a job if the employer offered to assist them in repaying their student loans. Prospective workers said this benefit was more important than many other traditional benefits and perks. Employers who help employees repay their student loans also are finding that they attract more talented and diverse applicants to positions.

Enhance retention

Both younger and older employees are affected by student loan debt. And while employees ages 25 to 49 carry 70% of it, many older workers also have student loans.

Research shows that employees into their 60s owe nearly $229 billion in student loans, or about $33,000 each. Older workers have borrowed money to return to college to keep their job skills relevant or to help their kids or grandchildren with college tuition costs.

Employees are likely to stay more than five years with an employer if they receive student loan repayment assistance. So offering this benefit can increase retention and lower turnover costs.

Improve Job Performance

Employees with student loans worry about how to repay their debts while also covering health, family and daily living expenses. That’s why it’s important to encourage your employer to help repay your student loans.

Employees who receive help repaying student loans tend to be less stressed and take fewer sick days. Because their financial worries are relieved, workers can focus better on their jobs. They believe their employer cares about them and wants to help them improve their financial well-being. So they become invested in seeing the business succeed.

Learn more about BenefitEd and Employee Choice programs by visiting www.youbenefited.com, calling 844-358-5707 or emailing support@youbenefited.com

Sources:
BenefitEd Employee Choice
Employee Benefit Research Institute
Plan Sponsor

Leave a comment